How To Know If Adoption Is The Solution To Your Crisis Pregnancy

Derek Williams

Are you pregnant and scared? Trying to figure out what your best options are? Consider this: Adoption is a beautiful option. Adoption is the legal transfer of parental rights from the natural (birth) parents to the adoptive parent. Adoption helps three people: you, the adoptive parent, and the child. There are many myths about adoption, but did you know that there are three different types of adoptions? A crisis pregnancy doesn’t have to be a crisis. This may help you know if adoption is right for you and your child.

know if adoption

1. Closed adoption

One question to ask yourself when in a crisis pregnancy is: do I want complete anonymity? If so, a closed adoption may be an appropriate solution. A closed adoption is when a thoughtful birth mom places her child for adoption. With the assistance of an attorney and a reputable adoption agency, the birth mom relinquishes her parental rights. In a closed adoption, the birth mom reserves the right to hold back any of her own personal information to the adoptive family. The benefit to the birth mom is that she protects her confidentiality. However, this can be a barrier to the child should he need medical history in the future. Or if he wants information on the circumstances of his adoption. Or if he simply wants to develop a relationship, at a later date. But if you cannot raise your own child, a closed adoption may be a good option.

2. Open Adoption

Another question to ask yourself is: Can I make a Life Plan for my child? A life plan is when a woman considering placing her child in a loving adoptive home becomes actively involved in the process. The woman participates in what type family the child will be placed in. And in some cases, she can opt for an open adoption where there will be limited contact between mom and child. With the assistance of attorneys, the woman making an adoption plan and the adoptive parents form an adoption contract which includes the details of contact and visit.

3. Kinship Adoption

A third question to ask yourself is: Are there close relatives or extended family that can raise my child? There may be someone in your family that has been yearning to adopt a child but have been unable to for one reason or another. What started out as a crisis in your life could end up being a blessing all the way around. The advantage here is that the child stays in the family, perhaps in a home that he is already familiar with.

Is adoption the solution to your crisis pregnancy? Only you can decide. Perhaps you can raise the child on your own like so many other women with crisis pregnancies have done before you. But if you do choose adoption, know that you are solving a crisis, not only for you but for adoptive parents, who may be facing infertility and of course the child. A crisis pregnancy doesn’t have to be a crisis.